Highly Capable Program
Programa Altamente Capaz

Special Programs

Grants

The district receives funding from State and Federal grants, as well as local levy and Basic Education Allocation funds.

Budget

Being conservative is the standard of which business is done at the Brewster School District. Having enough resources to do what needs to be done and using it to create the best education possible, while don't building reserves to unnecessary amounts are our beliefs. this way of thinking has allowed the district to receive close to $2 million of grant funds. When a portion of matching funds were required, the funds in reserve were available for that purpose. minimum suggested reserves are 7%-9% of the budget, currently we are at about 9%. this minimum covers one month payroll and a small amount for emergency costs. 

Ser conservador es el estandar de las cuales se hacen los negocios en el DIstrito Escholar de Brewster. Contar con los suficientes recursos para hacer lo que hay que hacer y utilizarlo para crear la mejor educacion possible, aunque no es la acumulacion de reservas a cantidades innecesarias son nuestras creencias. Esta forma de pensar ha permitido al distrito recibir cerca de $2 millones en fondos de la subvencion, cuando se require una porcion de fondos de contrapartida, los fondos de reserve estaban disponibles para tal fin. Las reservas minimas sugeridas son 7% y el 9% del presupuesto, actualmente estamos en alrededor del 9%. Este minimo cubre una nomina mesual y una pequena cantidad para gastos de emergencia. 

Homeless/ McKinney-Vento/ Foster Care

Student Housing Questionaire- English 

Student Housing Questionaire- Espanol

 

About the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1986 is a federal law that provides money for homeless shelter programs. "Homeless" children are also entitled to the protections of the McKinney-Vento Act.

The McKinney-Vento Act defines homeless children as "individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence." The act provides examples of children who would fall under this definition:

  1. Children sharing housing due to economic hardship or loss of housing;

  2. Children living in "motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camp grounds due to lack of alternative accommodations"

  3. Children living in "emergency or transitional shelters"

  4. Children whose primary nighttime residence is not ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation (e.g. park benches, etc)

  5. Children living in "cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations…"

  6. Children living in migratory shelters

 

The McKinney-Vento Act ensures homeless children transportation to and from school free of charge, allowing children to attend their school of origin (last school enrolled or the school they attended when they first become homeless) regardless of what district the family resides in. It requires schools to register homeless children even if they lack normally required documents, such as immunization records or proof of residence.

Washington State's Role

The McKinney-Vento Act is a conditional funding act—the federal government gives grants to states and, in return, the grantee states are bound by the terms of the act. If a state chooses not to accept federal funds for these purposes, it does not have to implement the act.

To implement the McKinney-Vento Act, the state must designate a statewide homeless coordinator to review policies and create procedures, including dispute resolution procedures, to ensure that homeless children are able to attend school.

School Districts' Responsibilities Local school districts must appoint Liaison contacts (PDF) to ensure that school staff are aware of these rights, to provide public notice to homeless families (at shelters and at school) and to facilitate access to school and transportation services.

 

Brewster School District’s Liaison:

Homeless Education Contact for Brewster School District is Dianne Roys Johnson.  She can be reached at 509-689-2581 ext.610 or drjohnson@brewsterbears.org  

 

 

Child Find

Child Find is a national program available through the public schools to identify those with special needs. Toddlers as well as school-aged children are eligible for this free service.

 

Any child may qualify for free services if they have delays in speech, language, fine motor, gross motor and/or learning, or if their learning is impacted by vision, hearing and/or mobility limitations. All school districts within Washington State have Child Find screenings available. If your family is living in a temporary situation, you may contact the district where you are staying to attend a screening.

Please call Estella Martinez at 689-2581, Extension 613 to schedule an appointment.

Child Find es un programa nacional disponible a traves de las escuelas publicas para identificar a las personas con necesidades especials. Los ninos pequenos y ninos en edad escolar son elegibles para este servicio gratuito.

 

Los ninos pueden calificar para los servicios gratuito si tienen retrasos en el habla, lenguje, motricidad fina, motricidad gruesa y / o apprendizaje, o sis u apprendizaje se ve afectado por la vision, la audicion y limitaciones de movilidad. Todos los distritos escolares dentro del estado de Washington tienen disponible la evaluación para la detección de casos.  Si su familia vive en un alojamiento temporal, puede ponerse en contacto con el distrito donde se encuentra para que le realicen la evaluación.

Por favor llame a Estella Martinez en 689-2581, Extension 613 para programar una cita.

 

Learning Assistance Program (LAP)

The Learning Assistance Program (LAP) is Washington's state-funded program that provides additional academic support to eligible students. LAP funds are available to support programs in grades K-12 in reading, writing, and mathematics, and in readiness for those subjects.

OSPI oversees the distribution of over $286 million to Washington state schools through Title I, Part A and the Learning Assistance Program.

Migrant Program 

The goal of the Migrant Education Program is to ensure that all migrant students reach challenging academic standards and graduate with a high school diploma (or complete a GED) that prepares them for responsible citizenship, further learning, and productive employment.

Special Education 

Special Education and related services are provided annually to about 124,000 eligible students in the state across 295 school districts. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) ensures that children with disabilities and the families of such children have access to a free appropriate public education (FAPE).  IDEA is focused on improving educational results for children with disabilities.  RCW 28A.155 provides the statutory basis for special education services in Washington, and WAC 392-172A provides the regulatory basis for both IDEA and RCW 28A.155.

 

Child Find

Child Find is a national program available through the public schools to identify those with special needs. Toddlers as well as school-aged children are eligible for this free service.

Any child may qualify for free services if they have delays in speech, language, fine motor, gross motor and/or learning, or if their learning is impacted by vision, hearing and/or mobility limitations. All school districts within Washington State have Child Find screenings available. If your family is living in a temporary situation, you may contact the district where you are staying to attend a screening.

Please call Estella Martinez at 689-2581, Extension 613 to schedule an appointment for February 8, 2017 from 3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m in the Brewster Elementary Library.

 

Child Find es un programa nacional disponible a traves de las escuelas publicas para identificar a las personas con necesidades especials. Los ninos pequenos y ninos en edad escolar son elegibles para este servicio gratuito.

 

Los ninos pueden calificar para los servicios gratuito si tienen retrasos en el habla, lenguje, motricidad fina, motricidad gruesa y / o apprendizaje, o sis u apprendizaje se ve afectado por la vision, la audicion y limitaciones de movilidad. Todos los distritos escolares dentro del estado de Washington tienen disponible la evaluación para la detección de casos.  Si su familia vive en un alojamiento temporal, puede ponerse en contacto con el distrito donde se encuentra para que le realicen la evaluación.

Por favor llame a Estella Martinez en 689-2581, Extension 613 para programar una cita para 8 de febrero 2017 de 3:30 pm a 6:00 pm en la biblioteca de la escuela primaria. 

 

Data Management

 http://www.k12.wa.us/SpecialEd/Data/default.aspx

OSPI must report annually to the public on the performance of each school district or educational service agency located in the State of Washington on the targets set in the state performance plan (SPP). Statewide and district performance data are located within this section of the OSPI website. Also included within this section are federal data collections forms, instructions and resources; federal grant applications; the state performance plan and annual performance reports.

 

Dispute Resolution 

http://www.k12.wa.us/SpecialEd/DisputeResolution/default.aspx

The following pages provide an overview of the three dispute resolution processes available for students aged 3 through 21 years under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA).

 

Program Review

 http://www.k12.wa.us/SpecialEd/programreview/default.aspx

The Special Education Program Review Team collaborates with school districts to ensure improved educational results and functional outcomes for all children with disabilities. Washington’s program review systems includes a review of both quantitative and qualitative information provided by districts to ensure that districts are implementing the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004.

TBIP State Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program 

The State Transitional Bilingual Instructional Program (STBIP), with the involvement of parents, educators, and community, is committed to addressing the unique needs of students from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds and to help them achieve the high content and performance standards expected of all students in Washington State.  The program helps English Language Learners (ELLs) to become proficient in English and to meet State learning standards.  Created in 1979, the program serves about eight percent of the state's student population.

 

 

Program Definition

 

Washington State Law WAC 392-160 defines “Transitional Bilingual Instruction Program” as a system of instruction which:

  • Uses two languages, one of which is English, as a means of instruction to build upon and expand language skills to enable a student to achieve competency in English.

  • Teaches concepts and knowledge in the primary language of a student, while the student also acquires English language skills.

  • Tests students in the subject matter in English.

 

Student Eligibility and Placement

 

  • Eligibility begins with the administration of a Home Language Survey to determine if a language other than English is spoken at home and if the child first spoke a language other than English.

  • If the child speaks a language other than English, the student’s English language ability is measured with the Washington Language Proficiency Test within the student’s first 10 days of attendance.

  • Students scoring at the Beginning, Advanced Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced Level are eligible for TBIP services.  Students who score at the Transitional Level are not eligible.

  • Under federal guidelines, parents must be informed of student placement in a language program within 30 days of placement.

Title 1

Title I Program Overview

For a paper copy or for assistance, please contact your child’s school office.

 

Para solicitar una copia en papel o asistencia, póngase en contacto con la oficina de la escuela de su hijo.

 

How do schools receive Title I, Part A funds?

First, the federal government provides funding to each state based on census data.

Then, each State Educational Agency (SEA) awards money to its school districts. Districts determine schools eligible for Title I, Part A funding by following ESEA Title I Part A rules.

Finally, each district determines which of their schools will receive Title I, Part A program services based on the school’s poverty rate and student

The school will:

1.     Identify the students who need the additional educational assistance based upon the required criteria. Students do NOT have to be from low-income families to receive Title I, Part A services.

2.     Set goals for improving the skills of educationally disadvantaged students at their school.

3.     Develop school-wide programs with individual student in mind, to support/supplement regular classroom instruction.

4.     Measure student progress to determine the success of the Title I, Part A program for each student.

How can parents help?

  • Communicate: Staying informed and responding promptly to all communications from the school or the school district.

  • Be an example: Showing your child that education is important by reading, attending parent/teacher conferences and attending open houses.

  • Volunteer: Volunteering at your child’s school and helping with extra-curricular activities.

  • Learn: Finding out how to help your child with classwork, homework and future education plans.

  • Get involved: Joining school/parent organizations, school improvement teams, advisory councils and other parent committees.

For more information, please contact Judi Jensen, Title I Coordinator at 509.665-2647 or judij@ncesd.org

 2018-19 BSD Parent Involvement Plan  in Spanish and English

 

How to Access District and School Performance Information

Cómo acceder a los datos de las calificaciones del informe estatal, del distrito y escolar

For a paper copy or for assistance, please contact your child’s school office.

Para solicitar una copia en papel o asistencia, póngase en contacto con la oficina de la escuela de su hijo. 

NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) DATA: Each year, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the state releases the school report card. Only state and national data is reported annually and the NAEP assessment is only administered to a sample of 4th and 8th graders across the nation.  National Assessment of Educational Progress data for WA State: http://www.k12.wa.us/assessment/NAEP/reports.aspx 

For online viewing: Click Here for the Annual State Report Card – Brewster School District

The state report card website has been updated and shows statewide report card data­­. There are also links that allow you to select the school year, school, district, etc. that you want to view and other information. It is possible to select the language you prefer to view the information in as well.

Title I Citizen Complaint Process

http://www.k12.wa.us/TitleI/CitizenComplaint.aspx

 

 Parents Right to be Informed:

1. Parents have the right to request information regarding the professional qualifications of each student’s classroom teachers or paraeducators. They may contact the building principal for this information. If you request this information the district will provide the following:

   • Has met state qualification and licensing criteria for the grade levels and subject areas in which
      the teacher provides instruction.
   • Is teaching under emergency or other provisional status through which state qualification or
      licensing criteria have been waived.
   • Is teaching in the field of discipline of the certification of the teacher.

 

2. Parents will be provided information on the level of achievement of their child on each of the state academic achievement    assessments.

 

Información de Título I Los Padres Derecho a ser Informado:

  1. Los padres tienen el derecho de solicitar información con respecto a las calificaciones profesionales de los maestros o paraeducadores de cada estudiante. Pueden ponerse en contacto con el director del edificio para obtener esta información. Si solicita esta información, el distrito proporcionará lo siguiente:

  • Ha cumplido con los criterios de calificación y licencia del estado para los niveles de grado y áreas temáticas en las que el maestro proporciona instrucción.

  • ¿Está la enseñanza en situación de emergencia u otro estado provisional a través del cual se han renunciado a los criterios de calificación o de licencia del estado?

  • ¿Está la enseñanza en el campo de la disciplina de la certificación del profesor?

Los padres recibirán información sobre el nivel de logro de su hijo en cada una de las evaluaciones académicas del estado.

Para solicitor una copia en papel o asistencia, pongase en contacto con la oficina de la escuela de su hijo.

District Policy 4130 Parent Involvement 

Board Policy 4130 - English

Board Policy 4130 - Spanish

 

25 Tips for Parent Involvement - English

25 Consejos para envolvimiento
en la educación de su hijo/a - Spanish

Interventions

Brewster Elementary Interventions

Click Here for Brewster Elementary Interventions

 

Brewster Middle School Interventions

Click Here for Brewster Middle School Interventions

 

Brewster High School Interventions 

 Click Here for Brewster High School Interventions

 

Non-Discrimination Statement: Brewster School District does not discriminate in any programs or activities on the basis of sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, veteran or military status, sexual orientation, gender expression or identity, disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups.

 

Specific complaints of alleged discrimination under Civil Rights, Title IX (sex) and Section 504 (handicap) should be referred to: Dianne Johnson, Special Programs Director, Brewster School District, PO Box 97, Brewster, WA  98812, Phone: (509) 689- 3804, drjohnson@brewsterbears.org

Brewster School District does not discriminate in any programs or activities on the basis of sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, honorably discharged veteran or military status, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups.  The following employee has been designated to handle questions and complaints of alleged discrimination: Civil Rights, Title IX, and Section 504 Coordinator: Dianne Roys Johnson, 509-689-2581 x610, drjohnson@brewsterbears.org; Address: PO Box 97, Brewster, WA  98812.